• Spring Cycling in Calgary

    With the uncertainty of COVID-19, life is looking different at the moment. Cycling is a great form of exercise and a viable form of transportation. As long as you are following the social and physical distancing protocals in place, it is safe for you to get outside and ride your bicycle.

    The temperature is getting up to 18 degrees on Monday and Tuesday (FINALLY). It is an excellent time to take your bicycle in to get a spring tune up. Many people don’t cycle in the winter (but they should, like our founder, Lonny) so your bike sits all winter. Because of this, some parts might not work as well as they should be. Many bike shops are open by appointment only and are doing contactless drop off and pick up.

    Some of the bike shops that are open are:

    The Bike Shop

    BikeBike Inc.

    Ridley’s Cycle

    Calgary Cycle

    Bike & Brew

    Bow Cycle

    B & P Cycle and Sports

    Power in Motion

    Each shop has different policies in place. Please contact them directly for more information!

    We are living in a strange time but one positive of the quarantine is that there are less cars on the road. This makes it easier and safer for cyclists to get around the city. Calgary has over 600km of paths and bike paths around the city!

    With the beautiful weather coming this weekend, now is a great time to dust off your bicycle and get outside.

    Happy (distant) cycling!

     

    For information on Calgary’s pathways: https://maps.calgary.ca/PathwaysandBikeways/

    Photo by Gints Gailis on Unsplash


  • The Best Cycling Trails in Canada

    Canada has beautiful cycling trails from coast-to-coast.

    Alberta’s Icefield Parkway from Banff to Jasper

    This 230-km stretch between Banff and Jasper takes you through the Rocky Mountains passing glaciers, turquoise lakes, wild life and wild flowers. With spectacular views but a steep incline, it is not for the faint of heart.

    Prince Edward Island’s Confederation Trail

    Best explored by bicycle or foot, the total length of the Confederation Trail is 449-km. From December 1 – March 31, the PEI Snowmobile Association has exclusive rights to the trail and it is not open to pedestrians or cyclists! The trail is equipped for all skill levels as it travels through PEI’s picturesque scenery.

    Nova Scotia’s Cabot Trail

    Cabot Trail is a 298-km paved look on Cape Breton Island in northern Nova Scotia. Featuring dramatic ocean views and highland scenery, the Cabot Trail has been described as one of the world’s top bicycle rides. Being quite hilly, this trail will need some serious training before being conquered but it is a great challenge and the stunning views are absolutely worth the burning thighs.

    Newfoundland’s Viking Trail

    This 600-km route takes you along the rocky, barren coast through a series of sparsely populated but picturesque fishing villages. You will see amazing mountains and cliffs, beautiful shorelines with crashing waters and spectacular views, and flatlands that stretch for miles. The rugged coast beauty rivals many other Canadian trails and the variety of landscapes will leave you in awe.

    Quebec’s Route Verte

    Route Verte is a 5,300-km cycling network that links all regions of Quebec making it the longest of its kind in North America. This route will take you from calm stretches along the St. Lawrence River to the mountain views in the Laurentides and is the perfect was to celebrate Quebec’s magnificent landscape.

    Ontario’s Waterfront Trail

    The Great Lakes Waterfront Trail is a route that connects 140 communities and First Nations along the Canadian shores of the Great Lakes. Stretching over 3000-km, it is one of the longest cycling route’s in North America. The trail takes you along some of Ontario’s most spectacular landscapes including, but not limited to, rocky shore lines, sandy beaches, farmlands, thick forests, rushing waterfalls, and tranquil forests.

    British Columbia’s Kettle Valley Rail Trail

    The Kettle Valley Rail Trail takes you on an adventure through BC’s wild spaces and deep history. The old, decommissioned rail tracks create a 650-km trail from Hope to Castlegar. The section through Myra Canyon, south of Kelowna, required the construction of 18 trestle bridges and two tunnels. The Othello Tunnels in Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park is a popular tourist destination.

    Have you cycled any of these routes? Let us know!